Tag Archives: DIY

Motorized DIY stitch-and-glue W catamaran kayak – the movie, by Berny Marsden

I took it on Coniston water in the English lake district.
It is brilliant! The 43 year old Seagull 3 HP motor starts 2nd pull and has lots of compression. It’s very light and the perfect size for Banana Split (the boat). On my own it will do about 7 MPH, and in tandem with my wife Andrea it pulls 5 MPH.

I have made a centre board and am making a rudder, mast and sails as my next development. Sadly, the English winter is nearly upon us so I might not get the chance to test until the spring.

I have found a seaside boating lake that should be ideal for testing the sails.

Berny

United kingdom

More about motorized kayaks >

Platform for standing higher on a kayak – for sight fishing, poling, etc.

Here’s yet another example of what unrivaled stability can offer in terms of additional versatility:

Platform for stand up sight-fishing from a kayak

Creating such a platform is easy and inexpensive, and you can design its surface area to be bigger or smaller, according to your needs. Furthermore, you can move this platform fore and aft along the saddle, to fit variables such as your weight and your fishing needs.
The versatility of this platform is also manifested in the fact that you can sit on it with your legs in the hulls, and your feet resting comfortably on the bottom. In this position, you can paddle, or operate an outboard gas engine mounted at the transom.

Naturally, when standing higher on a kayak, you lose stability, which is one of the reasons the W kayak is stabler for stand up fishing than all other fishing kayaks out there, and why it’s recommended to stand in a W kayak with your feet at the bottom of its hulls. The stand-up platform seen in the above picture would place you 16″ higher than if you stood on the bottom of the hulls, so you should expect to be less stable.
BTW, you can pole a W kayak while standing in its hulls, and there’s no real need for you to stand higher for this purpose.

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This stand up fishing platform is based on a pair of saddle brackets, but it’s possible to make one using different structural elements, and extend the platform’s width out of the cockpit. Having said that, one should remember that an adult cannot stand on one side on the kayak, especially not at such height.

Fly fishing sometimes requires scouting, and some fly anglers like to practice sight fishing, which consists of casting a fly at a fish as soon as they spot it. Standing higher adds some visibility in such cases, but reduces the effectiveness and ease of paddling, and increases the likelihood of losing balance and falling overboard, as if you were standing on a regular fishing kayak, and not in a W kayak, in which the saddle and extreme stability enable you to regain your balance and stabilize yourself instantly and intuitively in most cases.

Berny Marsden’s Stitch and Glue W Kayak, UK

This is the latest DIY W kayak project –

It’s the first DIY design allowing to take the boat apart.

Says Berny:

-“I have been busy building my W kayak.  I tested it today and did a dive off it with great success.  I decided to use the aluminum connecting poles and make the craft in three parts. This has the benefits of easier construction, easier transport and easier storage.
As I anticipated, it is very stable and should make an ideal sea diving platform. The seat section provides inherent buoyancy if it should capsize. However, I tried very hard to capsize it today and it never looked like getting close to it.
I am so pleased with it and very glad I saw John Forney’s Design.
I would be grateful if you could thank him for his help and advice.
Also, thanks for your help and encouragement.”

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Added in November 2012 –

Here’s a video showing Berny testing his W kayak:

DIY Cable Anchoring System For W Fishing Kayak

By Gary Rankel

Florida

In my never ending quest to simplify and diversify using my Wavewalk kayak, I just added a cable anchoring system.
I first assembled the pulley arrangement as per Jeff McGovern’s video in the rigging section of the W website (which had both the top and bottom sections of the cord at the pulleys spaced outside the carrying handles), but experienced problems with the cord coming off the pulley when moved forward or backward. So I repositioned the pulleys as shown so that the top cord passes to the inside of the carrying handle while the bottom cord passes to its outside.
This seems to work OK but I’ll give it a good test over the next week when the water around here clears after Debbie did her thing. If a problem persists, I’ll replace the plastic pulleys with the small metal ones that have built in shields to keep the cord from slipping off.
By doubling up on the anchor line as shown I can let out about 10 feet (which works well 90% of the time on the flats here), but can also easily convert it into a single 20 foot line when needed.
Of course, I also still have the option of my 6-foot metal clip fish stringer to anchor while fishing in a foot or two of water using the ropes installed through holes drilled in the top rim of the W.

Hopefully, I’ll get out later this week after the water clears. It was chocolate brown and full of grass and weeds when I checked it out over the weekend.

Gary

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More rigged fishing kayaks >