Tag Archive: storage

Fishing Kayak With 2hp Outboard Motor – Offshore

Here’s a recently produced movie showing a W fishing kayak outfitted with a 2hp 4-cycle Honda outboard motor, at the beach.
In this configuration, this kayak is a car top motorboat, eliminating the need for a trailer. It can be dragged on the beach, as well as on dirt, rocks and grass, which in most cases eliminates the need for transportation wheels.
Passengers and gear can stay dry due to the high free board, in combination with the cockpit cover. The kayak seen here is outfitted with extra large flotation modules on both sides, so it it happens to capsize, it should keep floating, even with the outboard motor mounted on it.
launching this watercraft is easy from any location, due to the fact that it benefits from triple propulsion: motorized, paddling, and poling (with the W paddle).
This motorized fishing kayak can even take a second passenger on board, although they may occasionally get splashed, as the 2hp outboard drives the boat at a 7mph speed.
This unique, patented twin-hull watercraft offers enough stability without adding stabilizers to it, and the driver is seen standing up while driving it, even in the presence of mild waves.
Steering is easy and intuitive, through an articulated tiller extension. This is particularly effective with this Honda motor, because it is controlled through its tiller grip handle.

More information about motorizing fishing kayaks >

W500 Kayak Outfitted for Photography

By Paul Ekman, Iowa

I’ve had the kayak out a number of times now and am dialing in my photography setup. I found that splaying the tripod across the top of the cockpit is much better than having the legs inside. This way, I have more room for my own legs and cargo and I can slide in nice and close to the camera. I added some hooks to the inside so that I can keep the tripod nice and secure given the weight and expense of the photo gear. I can control the kayak and casually paddle while facing the camera with ease. I just lay the paddle across my legs while shooting which works well. If I have a long distance to cover and don’t want to take the setup down, I’ll turn the other way to avoid striking the tripod while paddling more aggressively.

Things are working out well! I’ve got some great photos of herons and pelicans already – much better than the past years of trying to get close by foot.

stable kayak for wildlife photography

camera with telescopic lens mounted on stable kayak for photography

camera tripod mounted on stable kayak for photography (2)

camera with telescopic lens mounted on stable kayak for photography (2)

wildlife photographer looking through telescopic lens in stable kayak

camera tripod mounted on stable kayak for photography


Thoughts About The Future Of Kayak Fishing

Conceptually, kayak fishing is a great idea, but in reality, this relatively new sport is facing serious hurdles that impede its growth. These are technical problems related to performance and user-experience, and they can be solved only by a major shift from traditional designs such as sit-in kayak, sit-on-top kayak, and hybrid kayak (a small, flat canoe), to W kayaks – a patented twin hulled design.

From a new article about kayak fishing:

“Kayak fishing ceased to be a novelty, and it’s safe to say there’s hardly anyone in America who fishes that hasn’t been exposed to the notion of fishing out of kayaks, one way or another.
Still, for the huge majority of American anglers, the notion of fishing from a kayak is by far more appalling than appealing, and those who fish from shore and from all other watercraft outnumber kayak anglers by a thousand to one ratio -“

The numbers presented in this article are interesting, especially in view of the fact that kayak fishing is at least a decade old, in its modern form, which is heavily promoted by the kayak industry.

The article presents the major, unsolved problems that have dogged kayak fishing as a recreational activity and sport since its inception. These problems both limit the number of people who join the sport, as well as cause many participants to drop out of it. The problems are, in order of importance: Unacceptably poor ergonomics, lack of adequate stability, poor tracking, limited range of travel, limited storage space, restricted mobility.

More interesting are the conclusions, which stem from comparing the effect these problems have on the sport to the performance of the W kayak class relatively to the other common kayaks used for fishing:

“Does kayak fishing have a long term future?
We think it does, but only as a sensible sport and outdoor activity that would attract many more anglers, and not as the kind of unrewarding experience it currently is, which repels new participants while expelling existing ones.
The only venue is through an increase in use of W fishing kayaks rather than SOT, sit-in and hybrid kayaks. This is because W kayaks offer the solutions to all the problems discussed in this article, and some others, and these are the problems that make kayak fishing that marginal activity it has been so far in the much broader world of fishing.
Simply, as soon as realize that they can fish out of a watercraft that’s as small, nimble and lightweight as a regular kayak (not even a huge ‘barge’ fishing kayak..), and yet is as stable, dry and comfortable as a regular motorboat, and even has a similar travel range as a motorboat – they would adopt kayak fishing in growing numbers, and stick with the sport. The watercraft that combines the advantages of kayaks and motorboats, while offering better mobility than both, is the W kayak.”

So basically, the article presents an optimistic view for the future, when many anglers who are displeased both with other kayaks and small motorboats would benefit from the advantages offered by W kayaks – both human powered and motorized.

How Much Storage Is A Good Fishing Kayak Required To Provide?

Our answer to this question is “as much as possible – there’s no such thing as too much storage in a fishing kayak”. We believe that most experienced kayak anglers would adhere to this opinion, although it seems like some people who are affiliated with certain fishing kayak brands think there’s such a thing as “too much storage in a fishing kayak”  🙂

When a fishing kayak is concerned, the three fundamental questions pertaining to storage are:

  1. How much storage space does the kayak provide?
  2. How well does this storage space protect the gear stored in it?
  3. How easy and convenient it is for the kayak angler to reach the stored gear?

Even the biggest and most expensive fishing kayaks don’t offer a sufficient amount of storage space for a serious, long fishing trip. This includes SOT fishing kayaks, and Hybrid fishing kayaks that are so big, heavy and clumsy that paddling or pedaling them is hard, and so is car topping them. This is why they’re called ‘barge yaks’, and they require that you outfit them with a crate.

The only fishing kayak that provides as much storage space as you’d need for a fishing trip of any length is the W500 (and the 502, of course). The storage space in this kayak is protected from the elements, and you can always access it from inside the cockpit – even when you’re out on the water.  This can’t be said about the typical storage solution that other fishing kayaks feature, which is called hatches.

Read more about storage in fishing kayaks >